Posts Tagged Gyu-Kaku

June 24, 2005 – My weight in beef

I had the day off today as part of working Monday on a shift swap. I didn’t do much in the daytime, but in the evening I went to Gyu-kaku with the Penpal where I ate my weight in beef.

Mmmmm meat sweats!

Advertisements

, , ,

Leave a comment

September 27, 2004 – VCR Clue

Today The Penpal came to visit. She was pretty excited about my upcoming transfer to her part of Japan. Living in Numazu will allow us to see each other much more often.

We hung out and tried to play the Clue VCR Game. This was a favourite from when I was a kid. Similar to the classic board game, the goal was to solve a murder faster than the other players. To play, you watch some scenes featuring the Clue characters, and then draw some cards with clues on them. For example, the card will say “the character who ate beef at dinner is the killer”, or “the weapon that Professor Plum had in the library is the murder weapon”. It is a pretty cool idea, but like many VCR games from the 80s, the execution left something to be desired.

The English was a bit too challenging for The Penpal and I to play the game together, but we did enjoy watching the video and laughing at the over the top acting. In the evening we went to Gyu-Kaku for dinner, because Gyu-Kaku is awesome.

Interesting note: today was the first time that it has ever rained when The Penpal and I spent time together. Every other time it has been sunny or the rain just finished before we met. For a country that gets a lot of rain, this is pretty impressive.

, , , ,

Leave a comment

August 24, 2004 – Yakiniku and Twin Peaks

Twin Peaks

Today was the second day of my first two day weekend since all of my visitors came earlier this summer. I celebrated by sitting on my ass and relaxing most of the day.

In the evening I went to Gyu-Kaku near Mukogaokayuen station with Lux and Zoe. In addition to the regular slices of meat, we tried out some pan fried scallops. The waiter brought us a tiny cast iron pan that sat on top of our grill, and a pat of butter. SOOOO GOOOD! During dinner the conversation turned to TV shows. We started discussing Twin Peaks and how amazing it was. I have watched the entire series with friends twice from start to finish, usually in 4-5 episode bursts. We agreed that we should re-watch the show together.

Zoe was one of the few people in Hello House with an internet connection, and used it to find a slightly illegal copy online with subtitles in a Scandinavian language that we couldn’t identify. It was one of the languages that has a letter “o” with a line through it.

After working crazy shifts for the last month and a half, a two day weekend was fantastic.

, , ,

2 Comments

July 16, 2004 – Return to Gyu-Kaku!

I was working with a slight hangover from last night’s karaoke. Working with a hangover, no matter how small, is not fun.

After work I took Lux to Gyu-Kaku. Once again, the food was fantastic! Lux is a smoker, and usually I don’t enjoy eating in the smoking section of restaurants. However, the ventilation at Gyu-Kaku is very good due to all the smoky grills at each table. The fan above our table sucked up all the cigarette smoke and I didn’t notice it at all. Just one of the many reasons why Gyu-kaku is great.

, , ,

1 Comment

July 7, 2004 pt2 – Gyukaku!

For my family’s last dinner in Japan before returning to Canada, we decided to try a yakiniku chain called Gyu-Kaku. This post is going to read a lot like an advertisement, but I don’t care. Gyu-Kaku is AWESOME.

The closest Gyu-Kaku to Hello House is just north of Mukogaokayuen station, a convenient 5-10 minute walk from Hello House. When we got inside, we instantly smelled delicious meat. The staff literally screamed “irrashaimase” at us. Gyu-Kaku is a yakiniku restaurant, which literally translates to “grilled meat”. All of the tables have a small grill in the middle. The menu, which is also available in English, showed all of the different types and cuts of meat that were available, along with salads and some other uninteresting non meat items.

We placed our first order and received small plates of sliced meat. We all took turns cooking the meat at the table using the tongs, and then dipping the cooked meat into small bowls of sauce at the table. I had eaten yakiniku once before, but this was the first time for my parents and sister. We all loved it! We ordered different types of beef, chicken, pork, and even scallops, and they were all delicious. The only thing that other people were afraid to try was the beef tongue (which was also delicious).

If you have never eaten yakiniku before – do it! It’s amazing! Gyu-Kaku is fairly easy to find and with the English menus it is foreigner friendly.

Yakiniku was a fun choice for my family’s last night in Japan. We all got to try something new, and we talked about our favourite memories of the past week and a half. Since I was trying to extend my time in Japan, this would likely be my last family meal until Christmas. I am happy it was a good one!

(2014 Update) I still try to go to Gyu-Kaku every time I return to Japan. Yum!

, , ,

3 Comments

Return to Japan 2013: July 16 – The World’s Smallest Hotel Room

tokyo hotel room 1 tokyo hotel room 2 tokyo hotel room 3

On July 16 the wife was going to visit an old friend in Odawara. I was going to catch up on some internet time, and then meet up with her at Odawara station at 5:00pm. From there we were going to Tokyo for the night. Since we were planning on looking around Akihabara, I booked a business hotel not too far away.

During the day, the in-laws took me out to their favourite curry restaurant in Numazu. Japanese curry is like a stew with meat and veggies in a rich delicious sauce, naturally served with rice. The restaurant’s lunch special was beef curry, salad, dessert and a soft drink for 980 yen. After taking one bite I could understand why the in-laws liked this place – it was one of the best Japanese curries I have ever eaten. Rich, creamy and a little spicy. Yum!

I took the regular Tokaido line from Numazu to Odawara, giving me an hour to read (always bring a book). I met The Wife and we got a ticket for the Romance Car to Shinjuku. Unlike my experience a few days earlier, this Romance Car had no children running up and down the aisles. In Shinjuku we followed the signs to the subway line. Subway signs in Tokyo can be very misleading. Sometimes you will see a sign that indicates that the subway entrance is just up ahead, but what they really mean is just up ahead after 500 meters of tunnels and probably a few flights of stairs.

After waiting for a very rare train delay that featured continuous updates and apologies from the good people at TOEI subway, we made a quick subway ride across Tokyo with one transfer and got out at Kuramae station. Our reservation was at APA Hotel Asakusa Kuramae, which described itself as close to the station. In previous experience, “close” to the station could be anything from right outside the station entrance to a 15 minute walk down unnamed side streets. Fortunately this hotel was, in fact, actually close to the station, and cross from a 7-11 as an added bonus.

We checked in and went to our “double room” to drop off our bags. I have stayed in business hotels in Tokyo and Osaka before, and they are usually very small. However, this was, in fact, the SMALLEST hotel room I have ever seen, not counting my stay in a Capsule Hotel (story to come in the future). It was literally too small to take proper pictures. The main room space was about 2 meters square. It had a bed just smaller than queen size and a small desk. Under the desk was a small fridge that you could probably fit 3 beers in. A flat screen TV was mounted on the wall. The Wife and I were both traveling with backpacks, which went on top of the “desk”. There was literally no place for a suitcase if we had one.

The bathroom was one of those ubiquitous all in one units that can be found in small Japanese hotels. It was a molded plastic one piece unit with a toilet, small sink, and small, deep bathtub. A dial on the sink distributed the water between the shower and the sink, but not both at the same time. I am not a tall person (about 170cm or 5’7 for you Americans), and I was able to stand and put my hand flat on the ceiling.

For the record, there are “normal” size hotel rooms in Tokyo. You just have to be willing to pay much more for them. Our room cost 9400 yen for one night, breakfast included. It was close to popular tourist areas and a one minute walk from the Tokyo Metro. Like most business hotels it was a clean and quiet place to sleep, and nothing else. For 1000 yen extra we could have watched the entire catalog of PPV movies until checkout time. Don’t get me wrong – the room was okay, it was just really, really small. Hobbit small.

Once we got over the hotel shock, we went back to the station and made our way to Akihabara. Our late dinner was at Gyu-Kaku, a yakiniku restaurant where you cook at your own table. We stuffed ourselves on beef, pork, chicken, scallops, and a few veggies as well. If you are in Japan and like meat, eat at Gyu-Kaku. You will not regret it. English menus are available!

We rolled ourselves out of Gyu-Kaku and took a quick walk around the station planning out our shopping for the following day. During weekends in the daytime, Akihabara is packed with people and is difficult to move around. Tuesday evenings are not very lively, so we had a unique experience of being able to wander around without bumping into people everywhere. Despite being a fairly quiet, slow night in Akihabara, we were well aware that we were in Japan’s geek paradise, full of anime stores, video games, maid cafes, model shops, and porn porn porn everywhere. Seriously, so much porn.

At this point the food and long day started to kick in, and we returned to the hotel. We got into the bed only to discover that our “bed” was actually futon on a frame and not a mattress. I had been sleeping on a thin futon on the floor at the in-laws house and had been really looking forward to a soft, spring filled mattress. The futon was okay, but was a bit lumpy in places. Since I was less likely to get up in the middle of the night for the bathroom, I had to sleep against the wall. There was almost no space between the foot of the bed and the wall, so the only way I could have gotten out of bed was by crawling over The Wife, or by waking her up and making her move. Fortunately for both of us I was asleep within minutes of my head hitting the pillow and didn’t move until morning.

As I drifted off into sleep, I found myself, for the first time ever, being thankful that I was not a tall man.

, , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment